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Keynote Speakers & Panel Debate  

  

Friday 17 October 09:30 - 10:15 


Nicola Barden

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Nicola Barden
 Chair, BACP

Thinking ahead: therapeutic practice in the 21st century.

Learning from history is essential if things are to develop, and the last few years have laid the foundation for historic changes in the very concepts of counselling and psychotherapy. As statutory regulation inches its way closer we have had to accept that the fate of this cherished profession is no longer solely in our own hands, and we have been steadily working our way through the emotional, philosophical and practical implications of that. Protection of the public remains the foremost objective.

At the same time there have been enormous changes in the proposed delivery of therapy services; from the funding changes in the Third Sector, to practice based commissioning in the NHS, to the massive and controversial investment in the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. Will these initiatives really result in better access for clients who need help? Are they the way forward that will change the shape of service provision, or are they a glorified reorganisation that will get swallowed up by red tape?

In moving towards a core curriculum for training, an increased research awareness and engagement with evidence based practice, are we celebrating or condemning creativity? And how can we ensure that the next 100 years facilitate as much growth in theory and practice as the last 100 have done?

What can, and should, we be doing to be good custodians of this resource, and which direction shall we head in as the next century unfolds? Many questions, and perhaps a few answers, in this opener to the 2008 BACP Annual Conference.

Biography

Nicola Barden is the current Chair of BACP, and for the last three years has been closely involved in the development of counselling/psychotherapy in the United Kingdom. For eight years she chaired the Professional Standards Committee and for two years edited the Counselling and Psychotherapy Journal. She is Head of Counselling at the University of Portsmouth and has worked in Higher Education for 17 years, with previous experience in the voluntary sector. She has published on ethics and supervision, and on the development of gender identity, which is an abiding interest.

 

Friday 17 October 14:00 - 14:45 

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Julie Hathaway Coleman

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Julie Hathaway Coleman
Service User and Senior Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, Sheffield Hallam University


Finding hope: a personal journey

Julie's sister committed suicide in 2002 after 10 years of living with bi-polar disorder. During this keynote Julie will share her personal journey - making sense of this life event and recovering from it, through help from therapy and other support along the way. We will explore the importance of storytelling and narrative in this process and her digital story, "surviving" will be shown.

Biography

Julie Hathaway Coleman became involved in the world of mental health care due to the diagnosis of her sister with Bi-polar disorder in 1992.  She worked for MIND as an advocate and for one of the early Patients Councils in Hackney in the 1990s and subsequently trained as an Occupational Therapist. After 8 years as a practitioner and researcher in mental health, equipment, adaptations and housing she now works full time as a senior lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University. She has experienced mental health care as a service user in her own right, a carer for her sister and as a health professional. She has encountered primary and secondary care services including several flavours of counselling and psychotherapy from all three sides of the fence. This gives her an incredibly broad perspective on the field. Her work is now the integration and navigation of these experiences both for her personal growth and to help others with their own journeys.

Recently she has had the privilege of encountering the technique of digital storytelling. As a result of this experience she is working in collaboration with the Patient Voices Programme/Pilgrim Projects  www.patientvoices.org.uk to facilitate digital storytelling workshops for service users and carers in Sheffield.

 

Saturday 18 October 09:00 - 09:45 

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Mick Cooper

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Professor Mick Cooper
Professor of Counselling, University of Strathclyde


The Challenge of Counselling and Psychotherapy Research

Recent years have seen a growing demand for therapists to become research-informed. But how can a knowledge of counselling and psychotherapy research findings actually help therapists to improve their practice? This presentation suggests that one of the principal values of research may be that it can help counsellors and psychotherapists to understand therapy from the client’s perspective. In this respect, it is not so much what research teaches us that is important, but in how it challenges us to reflect on our personal and theoretical assumptions, and to be more responsive to the actual client in front of us. Based on an in-depth review of research for the forthcoming book, Essential Research Findings in Counselling and Psychotherapy: The Facts are Friendly (BACP/Sage, 2008), this presentation will look at some of the most interesting and evocative challenges to therapists from the empirical research field: that counsellors and psychotherapists may be less important agents of therapeutic change than clients; that non-directivity can be experienced by some clients as uncaring and rejecting; and that counselling and psychotherapy may have far better outcomes than many therapists assume.

Biography

Mick Cooper is a Professor of Counselling at the University of Strathclyde and a registered psychotherapist who has worked with clients in a range of voluntary, NHS and private settings. Mick is author of Existential Therapies (Sage, 2003), co-editor of The Handbook of Person-Centred Therapy (Palgrave, 2007), and received the 2005 BACP recognising achievements in counselling and psychotherapy award for his research into counselling in schools. Mick’s work is informed by relational, postmodern and politically progressive perspectives; and he is passionate about research as an opportunity for the voices of clients to be heard.

 

Saturday 18 October 13:15 - 14:15

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Panel Debate

Is the customer always right?  Therapy as a service industry

As times change and society becomes increasingly customer focused, therapy will inevitably need to adopt a similar approach by giving clients a greater voice. Listening to customer feedback and tailoring therapy to the individual is key to providing customer friendly services. But how can we create a balance between customer expectations in a world where many of us are in search of a quick fix and what we know about the often long and complex process of therapeutic change?

We will hear from several experts within the psychological therapies field debating this question and more. There will be plenty of opportunity to have your say and get involved in the debate or simply come along to listen to the views of your colleagues and peers on this important and pertinent topic.

Details of the panelists will appear here shortly.

 

 

 
   
       
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