British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

   
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Counselling and Psychotherapy Research Journal  

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Counselling and Psychotherapy Research (CPR) is an online journal for BACP members and subscribers. It is published quarterly by Wiley and indexed on PsycINFO.

CPR is an innovative, international peer-reviewed journal dedicated to linking research with practice. Pluralist in orientation, the journal recognises the value of qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods strategies of inquiry and aims to promote high-quality, ethical research that informs and develops counselling and psychotherapy practice.

It is distinctly different from other research journals as it promotes reflective writing. It encourages authors to write about their personal engagement with their research, and their relationship with the intellectual and cultural traditions that inform their work. Authors are asked to describe the real-world background to their study, in terms of practice setting, client and user experiences, type of intervention and organisational factors that influenced their work.

The journal is not just aimed at other researchers. Papers are written to be read by practitioners and those whose work shapes practice, such as policy makers, supervisors and managers. CPR articles are also of interest to those professions who may use counselling skills in their work, for example nurses, teachers, social workers and probation officers.

Accessing articles

BACP members can access the latest issue and an archive of articles back to Volume 1 through the Members' Area. From your BACP Account page, click on the CPR online link in the left hand side menu bar.

Non-members can subscribe on the Wiley Online Library. Libraries and corporations are eligible for competitive low rates.

For early view articles, new digests, news and events, follow CPR on twitter

Instructions for authors

BACP members are invited to submit papers for review. Please see the author guidelines on the Wiley website.

Digests for current issue - June 2017

Depressed clients who feel connected to pluralist therapy are more likely to believe change is possible

Evidence exists that depression can have untold consequences. Research shows that there are helpful factors across all forms of therapy. However, there is a lack of consensus about the best psychological intervention. The aim of this study, conducted using semi-structured, face-to-face or telephone change interviews, was to examine clients' perspectives about the helpful aspects of pluralistic therapy for depression. Read more.

A feminist perspective: Bridging the gulf between research and therapeutic practice through reflexive stories

Entering counselling and psychotherapy from alternative academic backgrounds can provide a familiarity with practice-based research; confidence that therapists sometimes lack. Focus is on the case study as a legitimate form of research, in which student-researchers can immerse themselves in their chosen topic. This qualitative, reflexively-engaged study offers anxious student researchers and their practitioner readers a more self-assured relationship with research and practice. Read more.

Taking a 'look back' at first person research

First person research and autoethnography appeals to Angela Cotter, as a researcher and practitioner in both nursing and psychotherapy. Determined to bridge the research-practice divide, she weaves a story from journals and creative writing over 30-years. Exploring the paradox of transcending traditional approaches to research, her own attachment patterns to inform her clinical approach with trauma survivors. She locates her own wounded-ness as central to her research and practice, and in doing so challenges research traditions. Read more.

A reflexive study suggests there may be an affinity between poetic and therapeutic responses

New research suggests drawing attention to the creative link between writing poetry and the counselling process can be generative. Unexpected connections and depth of experience can elicit high emotion. Reaching towards an internal and intersubjective space, fraught with uncertain meaning, the author interprets his own experience to stimulate dialogue about the internal processes of practice and their meaning in context. Read more.

An individual perspective: Using personal experiences reflexively in counselling and psychotherapy research

Interest in reflexivity has burgeoned in recent years, with counselling research being at the vanguard of this movement. Consistent attempts by feminist researchers to dismantle power relations within the research alliance are also noteworthy. However, co-created
reflexive knowledge, requiring researchers to make ethical decision-making processes transparent during the research process, is sometimes discouraged as biased and confused. Read more.

Participatory, reflexive research: Research conversations with mothers and children who have experienced domestic violence

A new methodological paper adopts a participatory and reflexive approach, conducting small scale, preliminary research conversations with mothers and children who have experienced domestic violence. Talking to vulnerable populations can be complex and challenging, and requires a consistently reflexive attitude. This is particularly the case here, where the research team is emotionally affected by the research and their relational engagement with participants. Read more.

Supervision seen as invaluable for counsellors working with young people in secondary schools

School counselling has received an increased focus in recent years, with counselling services provided in all secondary schools in Wales and Northern Ireland. However, there is currently no UK research to inform supervisors how to work with qualified counsellors in a secondary school ontext. This study aimed to determine the extent to which supervision can support experienced school counsellors to work safely in this complex environment. A qualitative design was used and grounded theory informed analysis of interview transcripts. Read more.

Shame, solitude and salvation: Living with anorexia nervosa

Evidence exists that women with anorexia nervosa (AN), routinely depicted as manipulative, deceitful, 'naughty girls', can be treated with suspicion and blamed for their suffering. However, research focus tends towards individual experience of developing or recovering from anorexia. The aim of this qualitative study was therefore to give voice to the lived experiences of these women. Read more.

 
       
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