1. How did the development of SCoPEd begin?

SCoPEd emerged as part of a joint solution from BACP, BPC and UKCP to resolve existing challenges caused by the lack of a shared framework for professional standards when engaging with government, employers, clients and commissioners.

2. What research was undertaken to identify these challenges?

No formal research was needed to identify these challenges – it was clear from our collective discussions with these important external stakeholders that this issue was, and still is, restricting opportunities for our members within the profession.

3. How can I find out more about the methodology used in SCoPEd?

Alongside the first framework iteration, the SCoPEd partners produced a methodology document (SCoPEd methodology 2018), to describe how the work has been undertaken and to explain the processes of formal member consultation and how and where feedback has been applied. This was updated with the release of the second framework iteration (SCoPEd methodology update July 2020).

The July 2020 methodology document shows how the Technical Group (TG) and Expert Reference Group (ERG) ensured that every item of feedback was reviewed and how each area of feedback was systematically considered in order to further develop the framework, while also remaining faithful to the available evidence. The methodology update document also includes details of ethical considerations and methodological limitations.

The methodology update includes information about the small group clarity check process by critical readers, which was undertaken to gain preliminary feedback about whether the revised framework successfully addressed concerns and member feedback, and whether the information had been presented in the clearest possible way.

4. How have the SCoPEd partners used an evidence-based approach to map what currently exists?

The three original partners have systematically and comprehensively looked at existing standards, competences and practice standards associated with current training, membership and progression routes as sources of evidence to develop the first two iterations of the framework.

Published standards and competences from other professional bodies, standards setting bodies, professional qualifications and relevant published competence frameworks were also analysed and included during the literature research stage.

In order for evidence to have met the criteria for inclusion within this project it must be referenced in or drawn from the published competences and standards of partner organisations or other, relevant generic counselling or psychotherapy competences, for example from UCL or other competence frameworks, QAA benchmark statements, qualifications learning outcomes, ethical standards, National Occupational Standards and European standards.

5. Where can I find out more about the evidence used for considering competences and standards?

The complete list of the sources of standards and competences that have been included is detailed in Appendix i and Appendix iv of the first SCoPEd methodology 2019.

Further evidence consulted for the second iteration is listed in Appendix iv of the SCoPEd methodology update July 2020.

Details of the evidence supporting each competence are given in Appendix iii of the first SCoPEd methodology 2019.

Decisions relating to additional sources of evidence are shown in Appendix ii and Appendix iii of the SCoPEd methodology update July 2020.

6. Was empirical research included as part of SCoPEd?

SCoPEd is focused on evidence from existing standards and competences, rather than mapping competences from empirical research evidence relating to client outcomes.

This decision was reconsidered in light of consultation feedback; the ERG chose not to expand into client outcomes research since there is insufficient research directly linking specific practitioner competences to client outcomes. However, within the sources included in the project, the National Occupational Standards (NOS) draw partly on client outcomes research.

7. Who are the people involved with considering the evidence for SCoPEd?

You can find out about the members of the ERG and TG in Appendix i of the SCoPEd methodology update July 2020, or on our SCoPEd governance page.

8. How was the methodology for SCoPEd work chosen?

The collaboration agreed to use the Roth and Pilling (2008) methodology as the starting point for SCoPEd. However, when reviewing the available research literature, it became apparent that this methodology was not broad enough to capture all relevant information about training and practice standards.

A wide range of information was reviewed, including practice standards, job descriptions, learning outcomes from training curricula and qualifications at all levels, as well as ethical codes of practice. Direct client outcomes-based evidence was excluded from the research inclusion criteria as this doesn’t relate to competences acquired at the point of completing training and entering the profession. A full list of sources can be found in the SCoPEd methodology 2019 document and SCoPEd methodology update July 2020.

9. What type of evidence meets the criteria for submission to the SCoPEd framework?

In order for evidence to be considered within the scope of this project it must be referenced in or drawn from the published competences and standards of partner organisations or other, relevant generic counselling or psychotherapy competences, for example from UCL or other competence frameworks, QAA benchmark statements, qualifications learning outcomes, ethical standards, National Occupational Standards and European standards.

Inevitably, not all the feedback we receive results in changes to the framework. However, we do listen to, read and consider all member feedback we receive.

10. Who will decide if BACP adopts the SCoPEd framework?

Once a final framework is published the decision as to whether BACP will choose to adopt it will be made by BACP’s Board.

11. Why is this decision being made by BACP’s Board?

Board members are elected by the wider BACP membership to lead and set the strategic policy direction on behalf of BACP and its members. This regularly includes making important and complex decisions about policy initiatives that set out the long-term future for the organisation and its members.