This is an invitation for you to take part in a research project looking at your experience of the sudden and unexpected death of a therapy client.

The aim of this study is to understand what this experience was like for you.
If you are interested in taking part, please read the following inclusion criteria:

  • you have had two years post-qualified experience as a Counsellor, Psychotherapist, and/or Psychologist 
  • you have provided therapy sessions to an adult client (aged 18 and over) who has died suddenly and unexpectedly
  • your client may have died under the following circumstances:
    - sudden ill health (such as a heart attack or stroke)
    - a road traffic accident or transport disaster
    - drowning, falling, or other accidental tragedy
    - sudden death from a serious illness that has been previously undiagnosed
    - sudden death from an illness that has been known about, but where the death was not expected (such as epilepsy)

If you have experienced the sudden death of a client who has died as a result of suicide or homicide, unfortunately you will not be able to take part 

Your involvement

I would like to arrange for a one-on-one interview that will last approximately one hour. We can either arrange for this to be face-to-face, or through an online platform (such as Skype). The interview can be arranged at a mutually convenient day and time. You will be asked to talk about your personal experience of the sudden and unexpected death of your therapy client. There are no specific questions that need answering. The interview will be recorded via Dictaphone for analysis. All information obtained will remain confidential and be handled in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Act (2018).

If you are interested in taking part, or would like to know more, please contact me via email n3137355@live.tees.ac.uk

This research is being carried out by Katherine Smith, a trainee Counselling Psychologist, studying at Teesside University. This research has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the School of Social Sciences and Law.

Thank you
Katherine